Tackling the human factor in anti-counterfeiting

“Discussing the human factor is much easier than taking it into account when building a protection strategy, and this is increasingly an issue because – while everybody knows that humans can be the weakest link in the security chain, nobody has a realistic idea for improvement,” state Optaglio´s Petr Hampl a Libor Sustr in their article for Securing Industry.

It is often said that the human factor is the weakest link in anti-counterfeiting – and that‘s not surprising as a similar situation exists in all security areas.

Current anti-counterfeit technologies are becoming so advanced that imitation of the latest generation of protection elements can be almost impossible. However, even the best protection elements are useless if there is no one primed to examine them thoroughly. That means inspectors need to pay sufficient attention and be well trained. After all, there are case studies of frauds that include accepting counterfeit documents with completely missing security elements.

Human factors, therefore, play a critical role, as long as the inspection process is not fully automated. But discussing the human factor is much easier than taking it into account when building a protection strategy, and this is increasingly an issue because – while everybody knows that humans can be the weakest link in the security chain, nobody has a realistic idea for improvement.

Holography company Optaglio is taking the first step to solving this situation the recent establishment of a behaviour laboratory in Lochovice, the Czech Republic, staffed mostly by external psychologists and other experts, to try to introduce some scientific rigour to the study of human factors in anti-counterfeiting.

The laboratory wants to draw together the current fragmentary information in this area, and build on it in the hope of applying it to the security setting. It is equipped with appliances such as eye-tracking cameras and environment simulators to examine how people identify protective features and measure the impact of stress, tidiness, changes in motivation etc. To make that a success it is vital that there is knowledge sharing between technological and behavioural research – and that’s the reason why the research centre is integrated into Optaglio’s technology-focused functions.

The lab is focusing on the following areas.

THE FULL VERSION OF THE ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE HERE. 

 

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